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Cardio Program of Excellence in Glycosciences

A Program of Excellence in Glycobiology Funded by the NHLBI

Team Cardio Program of Excellence

Our team of 42 people is comprised of principal investigators (11), research associates (5), post-doctoral fellows (14), graduate students (4), research technicians (7) and administrators (1). Our fields of expertise cover Glycan Chemistry, Carbohydrates Analysis, Functional Glycobiology, Glycomics, Proteomics, Biomarker Discovery, and Cardiovascular Disease. The goal of our program is to intertwine our diverse expertise to promote our understanding of the roles of glycans in cardiovascular function and dysfunction, and to train a generation of scientists who will continue to advance our knowledge in these fields, ultimately leading to novel treatments which ameliorate disease.

Team Biographies:​

Paul Aiyetan, M.D.
M.S. Project 4.


Paul Aiyetan is a Postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Hui Zhang. His interest lies in the intersection of high content biomedical and computational research to understand biological processes at the level of interactions, dynamics, and complexity of multiple molecular elements. He presently focuses on the computational and bioinformatics analysis of high-throughput data generated from the lab – particularly to identify predictive, diagnostics and prognostic disease protein biomarkers. In addition to developing softwares for quantitative analysis, he works on automating exiting ones for high-throughput proteomics data-analysis.

Using and developing bioinformatics tools and statistical analysis models to explore different high-throughput genomics studies across different platforms, Dr. Aiyetan worked in the labs of Drs Lui 

Contact:
Email: paiyeta1@jhu.edu

Giulio Agnetti, PhD, FAHA

Assistant Professor, Co-investigator in Project 3

Giulio Agnetti received both his degree in Pharmaceutical Chemistry (BS+MS equivalent) and his PhD in Biochemistry and Pathophysiology of Aging from the University of Bologna, Italy. He relocated to the US to train under Jennifer Van Eyk in 2005. He is now an Assistant Professor in Cardiology where he works on the role of intermediate filaments post-translational modifications (including O-GlcNAc) and misfolding in heart failure, with specific reference to desmin. In collaboration with David Graham and Jennifer Van Eyk, Giulio is co-ordinating the experiments addressing the interactions between fibroblasts and cardiac myocytes challenged by oxidative stress to mimic myocardial ischemia.

 

Contact:

gagnett1@jhmi.edu

Partha Sarathi Banerjee, Ph.D.


Post-doctoral Fellow
Project 1 (The Department of Biological Chemistry)

Partha received his PhD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in Chemical Biology, where he worked towards tailoring mammalian vectors with non-natural aminoacids and sugars and developing these as novel gene delivery agents. In October 2011 Partha joined Gerald Hart’s lab at Johns Hopkins as a post doctoral fellow. His present focus is on elucidating the roles of the mitochondrial isoforms of O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes, OGT and OGAse, within diabetic cardiac tissue.

Rahul Bhattacharya Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
(Core C3)

Research Interests: Synthetic Carbohydrate Chemistry Short chain fatty acid-modified hexosamine-core analogs and their biological properties as part of anti cancer drug development Nucleoside chemistry

Education: Burdwan University, West Bengal, India, B.S. (1999), Chemistry with Honors Jadavpur University, Kolkata ,West Bengal, India, M.S. (2001), Chemistry: Organic Chemistry specialization Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur-India, Ph.D. (2008), Chemistry

Thanapoom Boonipat
Graduate Student
Project 5


He was born in Bangkok, Thailand. He graduated as one of the top students in the Biomedical Engineering program from Johns Hopkins in 2011. He is attending medical school next year. His research interest is applying and modifying drug delivery system to treat cell proliferation. Thanapoom speaks Thai and English, and conversational Mandarin. He also likes to paint Chinese painting in his free time and have devoted significant time and resources auctioning his paintings for various charities in both the US and Thailand. B.S. in Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

Contact:
Email:moboonipat@gmail.com

C.Allen Bush
Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
University of Maryland
Baltimore County

Allen is also the director of the NMR core (Core 2). Research Interests: Chemical structure and three-dimensional conformation of complex carbohydrates of glycoproteins and polysaccharides of the cell surface using biophysical methods such as NMR spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular modeling. Relationship of polysaccharide chemical structure to genes responsible for biosynthesis.

Contact:
Email: bush@umbc.edu
Phone: 410 455 2506

Subroto Chatterjee Ph.D.
Professor and PI of
Project 5
 
Dr. Chatterjee earned his PhD degree in Biochemistry from the University of Toronto followed by a post-doctoral fellowship with Dr. Charles. C. Sweely. He joined the faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1975 and rose to the rank of Professor. Dr. Chatterjee has published over 250 papers, book chapters, review articles and scientific abstracts in the area of glycosphingolipids, glycosyltransferases, atherosclerosis , lipoproteins and vascular Biology. He has ~75 US and international patents and has founded 3 Biotech companies and serves in the Scientific advisory board and as a thought leader to Merck. Dr. Chatterjee also served as director of the Johns Hopkins Singapore Atherosclerosis and Vascular Biology program for 5 years. Dr. Chatterjee has received numerous national and international awards for his service to the American Heart Association, Distinguished Scientist award from Gov. Parris Glendening of Maryland, Mizutani award and Ranbaxy international award for medical research from his excellency the President of India, Dr. A.P.Kalam

Contact:
Email: schatte2@jhmi.edu
Lab Phone: 410-614-2524

Shadi Toghi Eshghi B.Sc.
Graduate Student
Project 4

Shadi received her B.Sc. in electrical engineering from Isfahan University of Technology, Iran. She started her graduate studies in biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins University in 2010. Shadi is working at the Center for Biomarker Discovery and Translation on developing a platform for imaging mass spectrometry of glycan biomarkers in tissue samples. This platform aims to facilitate the identification of potential biomarkers for early detection of cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
 

Kamau Fahie Ph.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow  Project 2 (The Department of Biological Chemistry)

Kamau’s interests lie in determining how the O-GlcNAc modification regulates autophagy, in particular in models of cellular stress and cardioprotection. Kamau, who is originally from Anguilla, received his B.A. in Biochemistry (2001) and is M.A. in Chemistry (2002) from Clark University, before he completed his Ph.D. with Cynthia Wolberger at Johns Hopkins University (2010).

Contact:
Email: kfahie1@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410 502 3210.

Nauder Faraday M.D.
Co-PI Project 4

Nauder Faraday, MD, MPH received a BA from Columbia University in 1984, an MD from Mt Sinai School of Medicine in1988, and an MPH from Johns Hopkins University in 2011. He completed his residency in Anesthesiology in 1992, a fellowship in Critical Care Medicine in 1993, and a fellowship in Cardiac Anesthesiology in 1994—all at JHU. He is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Medicine and Director of Perioperative Genomic Research and of the Perioperative Hemostasis and Thrombosis Laboratory at JHU.

Dr. Faraday is funded by the NIH to investigate the genetic basis for variability in response to antiplatelet therapy and to apply genetic tests to guide clinical management; and, to understand the role of glycoproteins in response variability. In addition, his laboratory conducts translational and clinical research programs in platelet biology and perioperative genomics. Translational projects use in vitro and vivo models to identify the mechanisms through which inflammation promotes platelet-mediated thrombosis. The aim of these projects is to identify novel molecular targets for antithrombotic therapies. Clinical research projects include a prospective cohort study that uses genetics and proteomics tools to determine the molecular basis for infectious and thrombotic outcomes after surgery.

Jennifer Groves
Graduate Student
Project 2 (The Department of Biological Chemistry)

Jen completed her B.A. and B.S. at Central Washington University, summa cum laude, in 2011. She is currently completing her Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University in the laboratory of Dr Zachara. Jen’s interests lie in understanding how O-GlcNAc dependent protein-protein interactions regulate O-GlcNAc dependent signaling during cellular stress and injury.

Contact:
Email: jgroves5@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410 502 3210.

David Graham Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Co-PI of Project 3.
 
Dr. Graham relocated from Canada following his undergraduate studies at the University of Guelph and Masters studies at McMaster University, where he studied several viral pathogens in the context of mucosal immunology, to work and eventually help to manage a group in the AIDS Vaccine Program at NCI-Frederick from 1998-2000.  In 2000, he returned to graduate school at Johns Hopkins, where he obtained his Ph.D from the Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Training program in the Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences under the direction of Dr. James Hildreth, where he studied the role of virion-associated lipid rafts.  After his Ph.D., Dr. Graham joined the faculty as a research associate in the laboratory of Dr. Jennifer Van Eyk in Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at Bayview where he obtained training in proteomics. David is now an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology and has active research programs in Cardiovascular disease and H/SIV immunopathogenesis. Dr. Graham has made seminal contributions to the development of optimized approaches for studying proteins localized to membrane microdomains by mass spectrometry and in the understanding of how these specialized regions are involved in the fundamental control of cell function and active in a wide range of disease.

Contact:
Email: Dgraham@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410-955-9770

Gerald W. Hart Ph.D.
Professor and Director
(The Department of
Biological Chemistry)

Jerry is the PI of the overall PEG, the PI of Project 1, the PI of the O-GlcNAc core, and the Co-PI of the Education Core. Born in Topeka, Kansas., Jerry completed his B.S. (Biology & Chemistry) at Washburn Univ. (1971) and his Ph.D. (Developmental Biology) at Kansas State Univ. (1977). He completed his post-doctoral training (Jane Coffin Childs) with Bill Lennarz at the Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine (1977-1979). He was promoted to Assistant Prof. in the Department of Biological Chemistry, at the Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, and rose through the ranks to become the Delemar Professor and Director of the Department in 1997. Jerry’s laboratory discovered cytoplasmic and nuclear protein glycosylation by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) (eg. J. Biol. Chem. 259:3308; J. Biol. Chem. 261:8049). Since that time, the Hart laboratory has published nearly 200 papers on O-GlcNAcylation, identifying and cloning the enzymes controlling cycling, characterizing O-GlcNAcylation and its interplay with phosphorylation on hundreds of proteins, and they have developed many of the tools and methods in use today to study this modification.

Contact:
Email: gwhart@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410-614-5993

Rob Harlan
Research Specialist
Core C1/Project 4

Robert Harlan is a Research Specialist in the Department of Pathology at Johns Hopkins University. His focus has been the development of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays for LC-MS/MS for high-throughput quantification of glycopeptides. Robert earned his master’s degree from Michigan State University and began his mass spectrometry research developing clinical LC-MS/MS methods for therapeutic drug monitoring at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Jennifer Hou
Graduate Student
Project 5

Since Spring 2009, Jennifer has had the opportunity to conduct research in Dr. Chatterjee’s lab, to investigate the role of Apolipoprotein C-I (ApoC-I) on the induction of the apoptosis of aortic smooth muscle cells, implicated in plaque rupture and subsequently in heart attacks. We have obtained preliminary data in vitro and ex vivo through a pharmacological and genetic approach, and plan to conduct in vivo studies. She graduated from JHU with a B.S. in MCB, earning general honors, departmental honors, Phi Beta Kappa distinction, and The William D. McElroy Award (2011). Jennifer aspires to become an academic cardiologist. B.S. in Molecular and Cellular Biology, Johns Hopkins University.

Contact:
Email: jhou4@jhu.edu

David Kass M.D., Ph.D.
PI of the Myocyte Isolation and Cardiac and Myocyte Physiology Core
(The Division of Cardiology)

David A. Kass is the Abraham and Virginia Weiss Professor of Cardiology, Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, and Director of the Center of Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He studied Applied Physics and Engineering at Harvard, received his MD degree from Yale, and following medical residency at George Washington University, joined the Cardiology Division at Johns Hopkins in 1983, where he has remained since. He is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and Association of American Physicians, winner of the Melvin Marcus and Basic Research Prize from the American Heart Association, and recipient of numerous honorary awards and lectureships. Throughout his research career, his work has always been highly integrative and translational, spanning the fields of ventricular mechanics, ventricular-arterial coupling, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, oxidative stress, and mechanosignaling. His clinical work in the cardiac catheterization laboratory paved the way for many studies of human pathophysiology and the development of novel therapeutics for heart disease, most notably cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). His basic laboratory links molecular, cellular, and tissue based analyses with intact heart physiology in both experimental animal models and humans. He has published more than 300 papers in leading journals, garnering over 24,000 citations. His recent work focuses on the basic mechanisms of CRT, cyclic GMP/PKG modulation of cardiac stress responses and the role of PDE modulation, cardiac myocyte regulation via TGFbeta and TRPC channels, and identifying and treating targeted oxidative stress maladaptation. He is also a founder of Cardioxyl, a company exploring the therapeutic role of nitroxyl for heart failure, and Robin Inc., an MRI-based device company.

Contact:
Email: dkass@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410-955-7153

Albert Lee Ph.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow
Project 2
(The Department of
Biological Chemistry)

Albert received his B. Sc (Mol. Biotechnology) from the University of Sydney (Australia, 2004)  and his M. Sc (Biotechnology, 2006) and Ph.D. (Glycobiology, 2011) from Macquarie University. While Albert is not directly supported by the PEG, his project focused on developing technologies to detect the O-GlcNAc modification support the overall goals of project 2.

Contact:
Email: alee123@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410 502 3210

Jeong Hoon Park Undergraduate Researcher Project 5
 
 Jeong Hoon Park is an assistant researcher of Sphingolipid Signaling and Vascular Biology Laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He worked in Dr. Michael Edidin’s Lab studying membrane dynamics and organization in cells ranging from lymphocytes to epithelial cells. He has had the opportunity to join Dr. Subroto Chatterjee’s research team since 2010. His research of interest is in the field of lipoprotein trafficking in cardiovascular diseases. He has worked under Dr. Chatterjee’s supervision to determine the effect of inhibition of lactosylceramide synthase on polycystic kidney disease. He has obtained some data on the effect of the D-threo-1phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-peopanol, a drug in development that is known to target the lactosylceramide synthase and inhibit the production of lactosylceramide. Currently, Jeong Hoon is pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Molecular and Cellular Biology along with a Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience with a Cellular and Molecular concentration.

Contact:
Email:pjh0528@gmail.com

Jungfeng Ma Ph.D.
Post-doctoral Fellow
Project 1
(The Department of
Biological Chemistry)

Junfeng Ma, Ph. D., post-doc in Dr. Gerald W. Hart lab. His research interests: 1) Establish the O-GlcNAc-ome profiling of mitochondria by using high sensitive and efficient tools for identification, site mapping, and quantification of O-GlcNAcylated proteins; 2) Explore cross-talk between O-GlcNAc and other PTMs in mitochondria as well as their relationship to different physiological and pathological conditions (e.g. diabetes and heart failure).
 

Sumita Mishra Ph.D.
Post-doctoral Fellow
Project 5
 
After finishing her Bachelors in Microbiology and Masters in Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology from University of Calcutta, Dr. Mishra earned her PhD from Indian Institute of Chemical Biology. Her major area of interest is Molecular Cardiology and Cardiovascular Biology. At present she is working with Dr. Chatterjee’s group in the Sphingolipid Signaling and Vascular Biology Lab at Johns Hopkins University investigating lipid signaling in cardiovascular biology.Ph.D. Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, India.

Contact:

Email: smishr12@jhmi.edu

Sarah_Parker.jpgSarah Parker Ph.D.
Project 3


Current research interests:
I am interested in understanding how developmental programming affects the function of cardiovascular cells in adult tissues, particularly in response to stress and disease.  My current projects include probing the cell surface glycoproteome in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells to detect surface markers that can distinguish developmental lineage of origin.

Education:
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
(2002) B.S. Kinesiology & Psychology
(2006) M.S. KinesiologyThe Medical College of Wisconsin
(2011) Ph.D. Physiology

Dr. Paolocci M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Medicine
(Division of Cardiology)

He received his medical degree from the University of Perugia (Italy), and after two medical residency in Clinical Pathology, entered the PhD program in Neurobiology obtaining is PhD degree in 1994. He joined the Cardiology Division at the Johns Hopkins University (at the end of 1997), first as a post-doctoral fellow, and later as faculty. Dr. Paolocci is a member of the American Heart Association, Biophysical Society and ASPET (Division of Cardiovascular Pharmacology), and he is the editorial board of the American Journal of Physiology (Heart and Circulatory Section), Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and Cardiovascular Therapeutics. He has authored or co-authored >80 papers in leading journals in the biochemical and cardiovascular field. The research focus of Dr. Paolocci’s laboratory is revolving around the modulatory role exerted by oxygen and nitrogen reactive species (RNS/ROS) on cardiac structure and function, under normal and diseased conditions such as heart failure. His research team has pioneered studies evaluating the in vivo and in vitro cardiovascular actions of nitroxyl (HNO), the one electron-reduction product of nitric oxide (NO.), contrasting HNO effects to those exerted by NO donors and other RNS or ROS such as peroxynitrite and hydroxyl radical. Current efforts in his laboratory aim to detect highly-reactive cysteines in the electro-contraction coupling machinery that may be targeted by HNO, accouting for HNO positive inotropic/lusitropic effects.

Contact:
Email: npaoloc1@jhmi.edu
Email2: naz@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410 502-5743 (direct).
Koen Raedschelders Ph.D.
 
Research Interests:
Several intermediates and modulators of TGF-beta signalling are subject to O-GlcNAc modification. My research interest pertains to the  role of protein O-GlcNAcylation during maladaptive remodelling of the  vascular extracellular matrix within the context of aortic aneurysm  formation.
 
Education:
The University of Alberta, BSc
(2004), Pharmacology.
The University of British Columbia, Ph.D.
(2011), Pharmacology.

Timothy Starosta, B.S.

Research Specialist, Project 3

Timothy Starosta received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Focus at Temple University, Philadelphia in 2011. He previously worked at the Cardiovascular Research Center at Temple and joined Hopkins (Agnetti’s and Graham’s labs) in 2016. He is performing the experiments outlined in project 3 under the supervision of Dr. Agnetti and Dr. Graham.

 

Contact:

tstaros3@jhu.edu

Punit Shah Ph.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow
Project 4

Punit Shah is a research Fellow of Pathology at Johns Hopkins University. His research focus is on using high throughput proteomics for answering clinical related questions. He is also invovled in developing methods for analysis of glycans. Before joining Johns Hopkins, He earned his Ph.D. with Dr. Ron Orlando from University of Georgia. Later, He worked in a company, Immunotope Inc, Which was involved in developing vaccines for cancer. He was invovled in identification of potential targets using Mass Spectrometry.

Puchong Thirawatananond Undergraduate Student,
Johns Hopkins University
Project 5


Through a program offered by The Johns Hopkins University (JHU), Puchong has had the opportunity to work under Dr. Chatterjee and learn laboratory technique relevant to his research. Currently, Puchong is an undergraduate at JHU working towards a B.S. in Molecular and Cellular Biology. He is a recipient of the Bloomberg Scholarship, a scholarship made possible through the generous gift from Michael Bloomberg, Hopkins alumnus, and chairman of the Board of Trustees. He is a volunteer tutor with the Tutorial Project of JHU’s Center of Social Concern, and also volunteers with the Maryland School of the Blind Outreach. Puchong aspires to be a pediatrician.

Contact:
Email: puchong@jhu.edu


Yikang Shi, Ph. D.
Project 1
(The Department of
Biological Chemistry)

Dr Shi is a visiting scientist in Dr. Gerald W. Hart lab, research focus is in understanding how O-GlcNAcylation of key enzymes in glycolysis regulates glucose metabolism.

Contact:
Email: shiyikang@sdu.edu.cn.
Phone: 410 614 1265.

Miroslava Stastna, Ph.D.
Project 3

Research interests:
Analysis of proteins secreted by cells by proteomic methods and mass spectrometry;
development of analytical separation methods for separation of proteins.  
 
Education:   
Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic, 1983, M.S., Chemistry
Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic, 1996, Ph.D., Analytical Chemistry
 
Jennifer Van EyK Ph.D.
Professor and PI of
Project 3
Co-PI of Core C1

Dr. Jennifer Van Eyk earned her Ph. D. in Biochemistry at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and is the current director of the Johns Hopkins NHLBI Proteomics Center at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, Director, Bayview Proteomics Group, and Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology in Biological Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering. Her laboratory is a leader in the field of clinical proteomics, which integrates cuttingedge proteomics and drives innovation in heart and vascular disease. They have developed technologies to quantify protein isoforms and post-translationally modified proteins in disease pathways in tissue and various body fluids. They have also developed MS-based multiple reaction monitoring assays for a number of membrane proteins and components of signaling pathways to determine their concentration in relevant biological samples. They have also developed assays to determine the extent of phosphorylation (or other PTMs) on key regulatory amino acids as an index of functional activity. In addition to publishing numerous research articles on her work, Dr. Van Eyk has also co-edited books on clinical proteomics including "Clinical Proteomics: From Diagnosis to Therapy" and "Proteomic and genomic analysis of cardiovascular disease".

Contact:
E-mail:jvaneyk1@jhmi.edu
Phone:  (410) 550-8510
FAX: (410) 550-8512
 

Shuang (aka Jake) Yang Ph.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow
Project 4

Shuang Jake Yang is a Research Fellow of Department of Pathology at Johns Hopkins University. His research focus is on developing analytical platform for biological studies, tissue glycoprotein imaging, glycan quantitation, and glycan sequence profiling. Particularly, he worked on microfluidic platform to integration of solid-phase glycoprotein/glycan on-chip profiling and sequencing with high performance liquid chromatography.
Dr. Yang received his B.S. degree from the Harbin Institute of Technology, China, and his M.S. degree from the Shanghai Jiaotong University, China, and the National University of Singapore, Singapore. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2008 before joined Center for Biomarker Discovery and Translation.

Kevin Yarema Ph.D. Associate Professor
Core C3

Dr Yarema was born in Williams Lake, British Columbia, in 1965. After completing an undergraduate degree in bioengineering at Walla Walla College, he went on to receive a PhD degree in biological chemistry under the direction of John Essigmann at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Carolyn Bertozzi at the University of California (Berkeley) where he specialized in chemical biology approaches for manipulating glycosylation in living cells. He is now an associate professor in the Biomedical Engineering department of The Johns Hopkins University, where he is pursuing systems biology approaches for determining the role of glycosylation in health and disease and developing applications—such as cancer treatment—for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering methodologies.

Contact:
Email: kyarema1@jhu.edu
Phone: 410.614.6835
Fax: 410.614.6840

Gokben Yildirir M.Sc.
Research Specialist
(The Department of
Biological Chemistry)
 
Gokben received her B.S in Biology from Uludag University (Turkey, 1998) and her M.S. in Biology from Towson University (2003). Gokben runs the O-GlcNAc sub core (C4) with the help of Russell Reeves. In addition to maintaining a long list of reagents, She developing and characterizing new antibodies and new models for modulating O-GlcNAc levels in vivo. She is also testing protocols (which we post online) and teaching people O-GlcNAc techniques.

Contact:
Email: gyildir1@jhu.edu
Phone: 410 502 3210

Natasha E. Zachara Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
(The Department of
Biological Chemistry)

Dr Zachara is the PI of Project 2, the PI of the Education Core and the Co-PI of the O-GlcNAc Core (Core C4). Dr Zachara received her B.Tech (Honors, 1st class) and her Ph.D at Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia). Her dissertation was completed under the guidance of Dr Nicolle Packer, Dr Andrew Gooley, and Professor Keith Williams and focused on developing new technologies to map and quantitate changes in protein glycosylation. Her post-doctoral work was completed at the Johns Hopkins University with Professor Gerald W. Hart. During her fellowship, She identified a role for O-GlcNAc in regulating the cellular stress response. Her laboratory is focused on understanding which proteins are modified dynamically by O-GlcNAc in response to stress, and how this alters protein function in such a way that elevating O-GlcNAc before, or immediately after, cellular injury is protective in both in vitro and in vivo models.

Contact:
Email: nzachara@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410 955 7049.

Hui Zhang Ph.D.,
Associate Professor
(The Department of Pathology)

Hui Zhang is an Associate Professor of Pathology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research focus is on developing high throughput technologies to characterize dynamic protein expressions/modifications and using these proteomics technologies to understand human diseases. Dr. Zhang participates in several research programs and is an investigator in the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), NIHBI Proteomics Center, and Programs of Excellence in Glycosciences (PEG).

Before joining Johns Hopkins, Dr. Zhang earned her Ph.D. with Dr. Roland Kallen from University of Pennsylvania. Then she joined New England Biolabs and Cell Signaling Technology to study protein activation by developing modification-specific antibodies and profiling protein modifications. Later, she developed glycoproteomic technologies when she worked with Dr. Ruedi Aebersold at the Institute for Systems Biology.

Contact:

Email: hzhang32@jhmi.edu
Phone: 410-502-8149

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